In Search of a Father’s Footsteps – June 7, 1944

The son of Captain Henry C. Hobbs is pretty happy right now.

For many years, he has been searching for the location in Normandy, France where his father crash-landed his glider on June 7, 1944. All of his men survived and they walked over four miles to a command post in Les Forges before heading back to Utah Beach and England.

Chuck Hobbs was in Normandy during the 74th Anniversary of D-Day last week. He enlisted the help of Footsteps Researchers to find the glider crash landing area and to walk in his father’s footsteps.

The search started with Myra Miller in St. Louis organizing the Footsteps Researchers team. Myra assigned Kevin Banks, our Archive Researcher, specific files to pull along with flight records and Morning Reports from the National Archives where the WWII records are stored. Kevin sent his findings to Myra who then worked on figuring out the coordinates, maps, and locations based on information found in the reports. She then sent her findings and Skyped with team member Florent Plana, who lives in Normandy. The next day, Florent met with Chuck and took him to the area where the glider crashed in 1944… they traveled along the roads where a C-47 also crashed (Henry Hobbs mentioned finding this C-47 in his interrogation report)… and then to the command post where Henry and his men ended up.

Chuck reported back, “Myra, I had a wonderful time with Florent this afternoon. He did a super job and gave me a lot of information on the probable location where my father landed. He was also excellent in talking to local residents about what they remembered. Thanks for setting things up for me. I look forward to seeing the files when I get home.”

Teamwork and passion… this is how we make people happy!

 

Morning Reports

Tracing. Exact. Footsteps.

Why are Morning Reports a critical tool in tracing the exact footsteps of your veteran?

Morning Report A Co, 506th PIR December 5th 1944

A Morning Report provided the higher command with an essential overview of all personnel activity within the company on a given day. It contains the following details:

  • The company’s exact location
  • Names of personnel transferred to another company
  • Names of personnel wounded or killed in action—in the case of transfer to a hospital, the report gives the particular hospital unit.
  • The strength of the company—that is, the number of active soldiers that day
  • An overview of the rations in the company’s inventory
  • Sometimes, a brief record of events about the company’s activities that day—e.g., moving or fighting

Searching Morning Reports is a labor-intensive process. They are stored on microfilm and require patient, careful searching through reels of negatives. Let us locate, process, and interpret your veteran’s files.

Disclaimer: Please bare in mind that requesting and receiving your files usually takes two to four weeks!