Crosses in the Wind

One of the most overlooked units in World War II is the Graves Registration Service. The men assigned to this unit were responsible for processing the bodies of killed US enlisted men as they were transferred to their final resting place. As Footsteps Researchers, we come across very interesting and sad documents when we image the Individual Deceased Personnel Files (IDPFs) for clients. Many times, we hold handwritten and heartfelt letters from mothers, fathers, wives, and others; begging for answers as to where their loved one’s belongings were or dealing with the burial of their soldier’s body.

In 1947, a book called Crosses in the Wind: Graves Registration Service in the Second World War was published by Joseph Shomon, commander of the 611th
Quartermaster, Graves Registration Company during World War II. Its first press was the only one ever printed making the book very hard to get. However, in 2016 a limited edition print run was done and the book is available again. This is a fantastic read as it describes the service and jobs men had to endure in less than pleasant environments.

The personal account of Joseph Shomon takes you from Bastogne to Berlin and gives you insight into the birth of the American War Cemetery in Margraten. It’s not a personal story of war, but a tale of the consequences of war. The job done by men like Shomon was a necessary one, allowing every enlisted man to rest in peace.

We are proud to assist families and those interested in the burial records that are housed at NARA St. Louis. Our Footsteps archive researchers submit the forms in person and image every page with great care. We owe a great deal to the men who served in the Graves Registration Service and thank them all for their service, commitment, and honorable dedication to our fallen warriors.

Graves Registration Form for an official burial of a WWII soldier.

2 thoughts on “Crosses in the Wind

  1. Judy February 2, 2019 at 5:43 pm

    Terrific resource. Thank you for featuring this little unknown and ignored entity. Deserves to be honored and recognized more for their contribution.

  2. Joy Neal Kidney February 3, 2019 at 8:55 pm

    I just ordered this book.

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